13 May 2017

Five Ways to Improve Your Photography

Photo from an old photography group session I attended several months ago which was pretty fun!

Good afternoon, everyone! Today, I'm collaborating with Amelie from laughing in the rain in her week of collaboratives by posting, "Five Ways to Improve ___," and today, I'll be talking about photography.

Photography has been one of my hobbies that almost started synonymous with blogging. It's cultivated to become something that I dearly love and enjoy over the span of four years-- which is a long time. While I'm still an amateur in regards to skill sets, there are important aspects to consider and remember when trying to improve photography skill sets. For the sake of this post I have left all but one of the photos unedited except for size.
Contrary to popular belief, point-and-shoot cameras can produce quality photos as well as DSLRs or mirrorless cameras do. The camera model is not the reason why photos are necessarily "better," per say, but rather because the photographer has taken the time to learn and understand all of the various buttons and settings that makes their camera their own. There are two ways to do this: one, to read the camera manual, and two, constant practicing. Learning takes time.

This was one of my first cameras that I’ve used over two and a half years—I got to know it well.


What is the subject you want to highlight in the photo? Are they placed near the side with a rather noisy background but you want to take a photo up close? Having the subject in the center and faced straight on may not portray the mood that is meant to be portrayed all the time. Sometimes, it's okay to zoom up, which if you are, try to step close to the subject as close as possible before kicking out the zoom.

Instead of taking a photo of the biggest leaf on a tree with a messy background that detracts from what’s meant to be highlighted…

Get close to the subject as close as possible and then zoom in!

Natural lighting will become your best friend. One of the best lighting comes from what is known as "the golden hour," which is that hour after the sun rises and before the sun sets. This lighting allows the features to appear softer, unlike in harsh direct daylight. In comparison to human-made lights, direct lighting is better, because sometimes, human-made lighting can reflect a reddish, blue, or green tint, depending on the light bulb.

Here is a comparison of unnatural lighting (also known as my room lighting)

And natural lighting (lights off, windows open). The colors are more natural.


Big seems better at times, but for photography, smaller is stronger. And don't hesitate to experiment with your photography-- who knows? You may adjust the setting to something that initially appears as an accident, but reveals to be a way to get that certain aperture and ISO ratio!



Always remember that there's the post-shooting process, also known as photo editing! Sometimes, the photos don’t always pop up the way that they were supposed to, like the lighting was dim, or maybe within the midst of editing you wanted to give a facial expression in the background the spotlight. It’s a way to make a photo better by bringing out the best parts and emphasizing aspects that you want to emphasize—after all, these are your photos, and you’re the one telling the story.


Thank you so much Amelie for this wonderful opportunity!

19 comments:

  1. Great photos, and wonderful tips! Very helpful! Thanks Abigail! <3

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  2. Thank you for the wonderful tips!

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    1. Eeep, thank you!!! I'm glad these tips are helping you!

      xoxo Abigail Lennah

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  3. Awesome tips and photos! Thanks so much for the great advice :)

    Amy @ A Magical World Of Words

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    1. Of course, Amy! ^.^

      xoxo Abigail Lennah

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  4. These are great pieces of advice.

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    1. Aren't they?!?!? :)

      xoxo Abigail Marquez

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  5. Great advice. You honestly have the best photos! How long have you been into photography now, approximately? By the way, I stole this idea of 5 ways to improve your.. and did a 5 ways to improve your blog's Instagram for my final day of a week of posting - hope you don't mind:)

    - www.whatlexieloves.blogspot.com

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    1. Thank you so much, Lexie! I've been into photography a bit longer than blogging-- roughly four years. And hey, I don't mind-- Amelie and I had the idea of doing something like this awhile back, but of course, this kind of post has been done by many other bloggers before, so don't worry.

      xoxo Abigail Lennah

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  6. These are great tips for beginners!

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    1. They are! And honestly, this advice is applicable to other photographers who have been immersed in their craft for a longer period of time.

      xoxo Abigail Lennah

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    1. Hey, Nabila! That's a hobby we have in common! I'm glad you think these tips are good.

      xoxo Abigail Lennah

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  8. YES YES YES!! As a fellow photographer, I TOTALLY RELATE TO THIS. Great post!

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  9. I love your photography so much <3

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  10. Wonderful tips! I am new to photography, and these were quite helpful!

    xx Bubbles


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  11. Really nice tips! I personally prefer close-ups too. :)

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  12. These are great tips! I think that natural lighting is super important ♥
    Amy xx

    Little Moon Dragon

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